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Honeywell-backed company is going to sell super secure quantum encryption key

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Honeywell-backed company is going to sell super secure quantum encryption key

CEO Insights, 0

Quantum computer software firm Cambridge Quantum announced it is going to launch a platform that can generate super secure cryptographic keys and sell them as a commercial product.

The startup based in UK, this year became a wholly owned subsidiary of Quantinuum, a quantum computer hardware and software company in which Honeywell International Inc has a 54% stake.The quantum computing generated offering is for encryption keys that Quantinuum and is designed uniquely and can't be predicted, a milestone in using hightech computing for a practical business problems. Traditional computers already generate encrypted keys, but Quantinuum says it takes security a step further with vastly improved randomly generated keys that are essentially helpful in hacking by conventional computers.

Also, Quantinuum said the generation of random keys is a solution that's relatively easy for these new devices as it finds into the essence of quantum physics in which a
particle can be in multiple states at one time. Once the particle is steady, though, it collapses into one, random value and loses its quantum properties.

The aspect of quantum computing that makes it essentially fit for deriving random keys is entanglement


The other aspect of quantum computing that makes it essentially fit for deriving random keys is entanglement, the term describes a characteristic of quantum physics in which particles connect with each other at a distance and take on the same properties. This phenomenon can't be replicated by a computer, which are limited by electric currents being switched to either on or off. Hence, Quantinuum only needs three high fidelity quantum bits, or qubits, so that it can create a pool of random numbers and symbols from which the keys are made.

Honeywell owns 54 percent of Quantinuum, has said the business will generate sales of about $2 billion by 2027.

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